Hurricane Dorian on Ocracoke

Island is chaotic day two post-Dorian; mental health services to arrive Monday

Friends from Oriental Sunday morning bring supplies to Ocracoke in five boats. Photo: C. Leinbach

Sept. 8 10:50 am update. More to follow. Updated 1:03 p.m. as to donation phone numbers.

By Connie Leinbach

Sunday morning, the island is chaotic as islanders seek help for various needs, continue to attend to their flooded homes and businesses and also to help unload boats bringing supplies from Oriental, New Bern and Cedar Island.

Islanders are arriving at the Ocracoke Volunteer Fire Department, the command center, for supplies, information and to share stories.

Wendy Mayo, Shirley Mayo Ireland and several folks from Oriental arrived in five boats with donated supplies. Several boats from Cedar Island, New Bern and elsewhere also are arriving throughout the day.

Mental health professionals will be on the island tomorrow, said Laurie Potter, Hyde County social services director, said Sunday morning.

A truck with ice will arrive on the first Cedar Island ferry and will be available around 10:30 a.m. in the Native Seafood parking lot. Hardy Plyler said it will be doled out one cooler per household.

Arriving through Trillium on Monday will be a psychiatrist, a nurse and four clinicians.

They will be available for counseling from 2 to 5 p.m. in the Ocracoke Lifesaving Church, Lighthouse Road. No appointment is necessary, Potter said.

Highway 12 north of the pony pens is buckled. Photo by Keith Gaskins

“Everybody I’ve seen is crying,” Potter said about day two of Hurricane Dorian’s aftermath. “Everybody is just tore up. It’s bad. People are just in total shock; disbelief.”

Save for a few, every business, home and building on Ocracoke got some damage due to the record flooding that over washed the island.

Boone Vandzura, chief Ranger for the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, said the Ocracoke ponies are fine. He did not have details.

He and Dave Hallac, Cape Hatteras National Seashore superintendent, were on the 9:30 Swan Quarter ferry, and he said the boat was loaded with trucks, porta-potties and portable showers.

The Salvation Army set up food service at the Ocracoke Community Center with breakfast at 8 a.m., lunch at noon and dinner at 5 p.m.

Many off-islanders are offering help with various things, material, person-power and cash donations.

The Hyde County Emergency Operations Center is coordinating all that. Call 833-543-3248 to donate goods and services, but please be patient as they are getting inundated with calls. 

Officials are working on a way to receive cash donations and the best way to distribute those. 

Lots of vehicles and helpers are on Ocracoke to help post-Dorian. Photo: C. Leinbach

 

Hyde County Manager Kris Noble, left, and Ivey Belch, pastor of the Ocracoke Lifesaving Church, coordinate relief efforts with an emergency responder. Photo: C. Leinbach

7 replies »

  1. Thank you for this! Our family has been visiting and camping at Ocracoke since 1989, the island is our little heaven, and I still hope to live and make art there before I die. I was concerned about all of you but the ponies too and this is the only place I could find the really local news. Prayers for a swift recovery for all.

  2. Connie, you’re doing a terrific job with these updates for islanders and those of us off island who love the place. Lee Kimball and Tucker Scully

  3. Hi Connie, thank you for keeping us updated. Please let us know how we can make a donation. We are keeping you and everyone on Ocracoke in our prayers. Regards, Barbara and Frank (NJ)

  4. We have been visiting Ocracoke off and on for about 20 years, and I want to second Karen’s comment — we love it and are sending prayers for everyone there!

  5. My heart aches for Ocracoke. There is no place that compares to it. My husband try to go every year. It is a village filled with love and people that still know how to support and love each other in the good and bad. It’s not a place I can really explain. it’s something you just feel in your heart and it brings a tear to your eye and still puts a smile on your face. It is a place we can all learn from. There is much joy and peace there every time we go. I am truly praying for everyone that lives there and for the village. Ocracoke will come back strong. We may no always understand why things happen but I do know God will bless and restore Ocracoke

  6. Two Ocracoke lovers from Carolina Beach, visitors since 1989 are wishing and hoping for the best for our favorite island anywhere. Please keep the updates coming; we’re hungry for news and when we can plan our next visit.

  7. We love you guys sending prayer, money and supplies. When we come— as soon as the island can have us whether that is weeks or months— we will be there to help in any way we can. – Christopher and Valerie Jones-Naughton