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Ocracoke volunteers receive Governor’s Volunteer Service award

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Rauna and John Conner take a scud around Ocracoke. Photo: C. Leinbach

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By Connie Leinbach

John and Rauna Conner don’t like the limelight, but the spotlight shone on them recently when they were among six recipients of the North Carolina Governor’s Volunteer Service Awards.

The Conners, who live in both Ocracoke and Buxton and who founded Conner’s Supermarket in Buxton, were honored for their efforts in providing meals to displaced families and assisting Ocracoke residents with storm clean-up following the destruction of Hurricane Dorian.

After Dorian had passed through Sept. 6, 2019, and done its damage, John could be seen all over Ocracoke Village helping where he could.

“We were in pretty good shape in Buxton,” he said about the aftermath. “We had water in the NAPA Auto Parts store and helped clean that up, but that was about it.”

Rauna and John Conner with their volunteer service awards. Photo courtesy of the Beaufort-Hyde Partnership for Children.

His and Rauna’s own home also was in pretty good shape, he said, so they let someone else who needed it live in their house and the couple came with their tractor to Ocracoke.

He helped first at Thurston House B&B take flooded items out to the road and then for weeks afterwards they helped wherever they could.

“We’re thankful (about the award),” he said, “But there are a whole lot of other people on Ocracoke that deserve it more than we did.”

Recently, the Conners purchased three lots along Lighthouse Road one of which they cleared for additional parking.

John is doing a little bit of clearing of the other two but has no immediate plans for them.

John and Rauna sold their supermarket to their son and daughter a few years ago.

“We’re real proud of them,” said daughter Angela Conner-Taws.

The North Carolina Governor’s Volunteer Service Awards honor citizens who have shown concern and compassion for their neighbors by making a significant contribution to their community through volunteer service.

Last October, the Ocracoke Strong Kitchen, which evolved after Dorian and went on for about three months after the Baptists on Mission left, received the award.

The award was created by the Office of the Governor in 1979.

Any person, group or entity from the public, nonprofit and private sector may be nominated for an award to their county award coordinator. Hyde’s coordinator is Kris Bowen, literacy and outreach coordinator for the Beaufort-Hyde Partnership for Children in Washington, Beaufort County.

The Governor’s Medallion Award for Volunteer Service began in 2006 to recognize the top 20 to 25 volunteers in the state. 

A statewide panel reviews and evaluates all nominations to determine the award recipients.

Nomination forms for 2022 will be available soon at www.nc.gov/agencies/volunteer/volunteer-awards.

Nominations are usually due in January.


A new parking area along Lighthouse Road at Martha Jane Road asks those using it to make a donation for the Ocracoke Interfaith Relief & Recovery Team, a nonprofit that is managing the state-funded rebuilding from Hurricane Dorian. John Conner, who with his wife Rauna, said he purchased the lot simply to do what he can to help the island.  Photo: C. Leinbach
John Conner cleaning up after Hurricane Dorian with his tractor. Photo: C. Leinbach

Ocracoke has a Hyde County liaison

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Teresa Adams is back as Ocracoke liaison to Hyde County. Photo: C. Leinbach

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Teresa Adams is back as the Ocracoke liaison to Hyde County.

She will be in the office inside the Ocracoke Community Center, 999 Irvin Garrish Hwy, from 8 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and Thursdays where she will answer questions to help keep islanders from having to go to the mainland.

She also will attend Hyde County commissioner meetings via teleconferencing in the Ocracoke Community Center. People wishing to make comments including complaints have an opportunity to do so during these meetings.

Ocracoke Community Center, 999 Irvin Garrish Hwy.

Stan Riggs recognized for ‘Excellence in Marine Geology’

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Reprinted courtesy of Coastal Review Online

CRO staff report

Dr. Stanley R. Riggs, distinguished research professor in East Carolina University’s department of geological sciences, was recently awarded the 2021 Francis Parker Shepard Medal for “Excellence in Marine Geology.” 

The national Society for Sedimentary Geology presented the award, which is named for the “founder of American Marine Geology.” The nonprofit organization focuses on science and education within a diversity of fields in sedimentary geology.

Nominees must have a sustained record of outstanding research contributions to marine geology or other significant aspects such as geophysics, geobiology, and geochemistry, providing there is a clear link to marine sedimentation.

Stanley Riggs

Riggs earned his bachelor’s degree from Beloit College in 1960, his master’s degree from Dartmouth College in 1962, and his doctorate from the University of Montana in 1967.

Riggs has been on the faculty of East Carolina University for 54 years. From 1967 to 1999 as distinguished professor of the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences and from 2000 to the present as an East Carolina University distinguished research professor.

He also received the Oliver Max Gardner Award in 1983 for the faculty member in the University of North Carolina system who “made the greatest contribution to the welfare of the human race.” 

From 1978-1983 he was a member, and from 1984 to 1992 was co-director of the International Geologic Correlation Program 156 on Marine Mineral Resources. In 1986 he was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Senior Research Fellowship in Marine Science by the Australian Minister for Science.

Since 1963, he has also focused on the coastal marine geology at the intersection of land, sea, and air. This dynamic zone of change and conflict is where the riverine, estuarine, barrier island, and continental shelf systems are integrated. He co-designed in 2000 and co-directed for over a decade a United States Geological Survey-funded, multi-institutional, cooperative study on the origin and evolutionary history of the North Carolina coastal-marine system.

Riggs served on the North Carolina Governor’s Committee on Marine Natural Resources in the 1970s, North Carolina Mining Commission-Environmental Position from 1979 to 1989, North Carolina Coastal Management Commission’s Science Panel from 1997-2016, and the North Carolina Legislative Commission on Global Climate Change from 2005-2011.

From 2012 to the present, he established and directed the nonprofit North Carolina’s Land of Water, or NC LOW, to put coastal-marine science to work within the public domain.

Riggs has lectured and led field trips for teacher-training workshops that introduce K-12 school educators to the natural sciences, published books on coastal dynamics and climate change, presented hundreds of public lectures, workshops and reports, and many documentary programs on television including NC public television.

“For more than 54 years, Stan’s rigorous research, inspirational teaching, and accessible outreach have provided major benefits to humankind and influences on coastal system management. His scientific understanding of earth resources, coastal systems, and visions concerning the dynamics of future change will continue to impact society, as well as our planet, for years to come,” according to officials.

Ocracoke events week of July 26 to Aug. 1–updated

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Beach days on Ocracoke, NC. Photo: C. Leinbach

To catch up on Ocracoke news and much more, click here

This post will be updated as more events become known.

Monday, July 26
Friends of the Library Used Book Sale, Ocracoke Community Library (inside Deepwater Theater), 3 to 7 pm Monday through Friday; 9 am to 1 pm Saturday.

Tuesday, July 27
Ocracoke Community Library (inside Deepwater Theater), Tails & Tales  Family Story & Craft, 6 p.m.
Coyote Music Den, 13 Cabana Dr.: Coyote Backyard Concert, 8 pm. All concerts are sliding scale “pay what you can” at the gate. No reservations. Walk, Bike, Taxi or Tram. NO ON-SITE PARKING but the venue has a lot nearby. Visit www.coyotemusic.net for details.

Ocracoke Oyster Company: Bryan Mayer, 7:30 pm.

Wednesday, July 28
Ocracoke Community Library (inside Deepwater Theater), Baby, Toddler & Preschool story time, 10 am; Visit from the NC Aquarium Ocracoke Community Center, 1 p.m.
“A Day for Phyllis,” celebration of life of Phyllis Wall, 6 pm on the lawn of Books to Be Red.–relocated to Community Square dock
Coyote Music Den, 13 Cabana Dr.: Coyote + Martin Garrish Backyard Concert, 8 pm. All concerts are sliding scale “pay what you can” at the gate. No reservations. Walk, Bike, Taxi or Tram. NO ON-SITE PARKING but the venue has a lot nearby. Visit www.coyotemusic.net for details.–canceled due to rain

DAJIO: The Wicked Shimmies, 7 pm
Ocracoke Oyster Company: Brooke & Nick, 7:30 pm.

Thursday, July 29
DAJIO: Raygun Ruby, 7 pm

Friday, July 30
DAJIO: The Wicked Shimmies, 7:30 pm.
1718 Brewing Ocracoke: Desiree Christa Ricker, 7 to 9 pm
The Breeze: Trainwreck 9 pm

Saturday, July 31
DAJIO: Kate McNally, 7 pm
Ocracoke Oyster Company: Brooke & Nick,
The Breeze: Trainwreck, 9 pm

National Park Programs on Ocracoke
The National Park Service Ocracoke Island interpretive programs on Ocracoke, unless otherwise stated, are outside the Ocracoke Discovery Center at Pilot Town Road by the south end ferry docks.

Stories of Ocracoke Island
Monday to Friday from 11 to 11:30 a.m. Learn about the location and legacy of Ocracoke Island. From serving as an early port village and primary point of entry to North Carolina to Blackbeard’s final battle, Ocracoke Island possesses a unique heritage resulting from its continued remote setting.

Shaping these barrier islands:
Monday to Friday from 2 to 2:30 p.m.  Wars, hurricanes, winds and ocean currents have all had impacts on the shores of Cape Hatteras.

War Comes to Ocracoke
Every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from 4 to 4:30 p.m. Learn about the role Ocracoke Island and the Outer Banks have played in shaping our country’s conflicts.

Ocracoke Island Lighthouse
Tuesday to Friday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit the lighthouse and discuss the details and history of this beautiful beacon. The base of the lighthouse will be staffed and open on dates and times listed above from June 2 through Aug. 13.

Banker Ponies
Every Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 10 to 10:45 a.m. at the Pony Pen. Come meet the ponies who once roamed as a wild herd and learn about their living history on Ocracoke Island.

Explore the Shore
Every Wednesday from 9 to 9:45 a.m. Meet outside at the beach access parking area adjacent to the Ocracoke Campground. Take an easy beach walk with a ranger and learn about what calls the beach its home.

Beach manners: A matter of etiquette and the law

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The Ocracoke beach. Photo: C. Leinbach

The Outer Banks and Ocracoke are fortunate that driving on the beach is allowed. However, there are some things to observe while doing so. The following “Irene’s guide to beach manners,” modified a bit for Ocracoke, is by the late Irene Nolan, co-founder, editor and publisher of the Island Free Press online newspaper based on Hatteras Island.

This isn’t a column just for our visitors. Sometimes even locals need reminding about beach manners. Also, it’s not just about etiquette. In addition to manners, beach drivers need to know the law and obey it and use some common sense. So, this a reminder to all about beach manners and the law.

Beach driving: All the state’s traffic laws for driving on paved roads apply to beach driving: Buckle up, observe speed limits, no open containers of alcoholic beverages while driving, current driver’s license, vehicle registration, insurance and license plate are required.

The National Park Service (NPS) requires a permit for driving on the beach.

Do not drive recklessly by cutting doughnuts or defacing the beach. Never drive on the dunes.

The speed limit on the beach is 15 mph and 5 mph when within 100 feet of pedestrians. Pedestrians always have the right of way.

Do not drive in front of other beachgoer’s camps.

Do not drive or walk into areas closed for resource protection, which are clearly marked.

Your tires should be aired down to drive on the access ramps and the beach – no matter what your manual says. The NPS recommends 20 psi.

If you get stuck, lower your tire pressure even more. Slowly back up in your tracks and move slowly forward. Don’t sit there and spin your wheels or you will get really stuck. Then you’ll have to call Beach Towing (252-928-8111) to get you out.

Do not wait until you are in the access ramp to stop and air down your tires, holding up the drivers behind you.

Don’t drive in the surf or standing water on the beach. Salt water is corrosive and can ruin your vehicle.

Prepare for emergencies by carrying in your vehicle a shovel, tire pressure gauge, spare tire, jack and jack support board, fire extinguisher, tow rope, flashlight and first-aid kit.

Keep pets on a six-foot leash. Feeding wildlife, including those begging seagulls, is prohibited on federal property. See more rules about the NPS-owned beach here.

Beach holes: Beware of digging deep holes or tunnels on the beach. It can be a lot of fun, but it can also be dangerous. Visitors to the seashore have been killed when sand collapsed on them while they were digging tunnels.

If you do dig holes on the beach, be sure to cover them up before you leave. Holes on the beach at night can be dangerous for pedestrians, emergency vehicles, and wildlife.

No overnights: Park regulations prohibit camping and/or leaving your equipment on the beach overnight.

Drones are prohibited on all the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

Do not litter. Be sure that trash bags are a part of your beach packing and carry out your trash.

Share the beach and the water. If you are going to fish, don’t set up in the middle of vacationing families. And, likewise, if you want to swim and enjoy the water, don’t stop next to a group of anglers.

Keep it down: Don’t assume everyone shares your taste in music. Some folks like to hear the sound of the surf and shorebirds. Keep the volume to a reasonable level.

A word about outdoor lights. It’s not the law in Hyde County, but please turn your outside lights off at night when you are not using them. We like to enjoy our dark skies here on Ocracoke, and it’s hard to do when your neighbors leave their outdoor lights, especially big spotlights, on all night long.

Airplane flips over onto roof after landing at Ocracoke Island airport

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The overturned plane at the Ocracoke airport. NPS photo

From our news services

After landing at the Ocracoke airport at about 1:30 p.m. today, a small plane flipped over onto its roof without apparent injuries.

The pilot of the airplane and passenger did not require transport to the hospital after the plane came to rest in the grass near the north end of the runway, according to a press release issued today (July 25) by the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, on whose land the airport is situated.

Hyde County Sheriff’s Department and Hyde County Emergency Medical Services personnel responded to the accident.

The NPS has notified the Federal Aviation Administration. No further details were available.

The overturned plane at the north end of the Ocracoke runway. Photo by NPS

N.C. commercial fishermen landed less seafood last year

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A commercial fishing trawler cruises northeast off Topsail Island. Photo: Dylan Ray

Reprinted courtesy of Coastal Review Online

 CRO staff report

Commercial fishers sold to seafood dealers nearly 20% less fish and shellfish last year, while recreational landings remained roughly the same.

In 2020, 42.9 million pounds of fish and shellfish were sold, a decrease of 19% from 2019 and about a 23% decrease from the previous five-year average, according to the Division of Marine Fisheries.

Recreational anglers landed 53.5 million finfish weighing 24.9 million pounds from state coastal and estuarine waters last year. The total weight harvested was about 4.6% higher than 2019 and a 4% increase over the previous five-year average.

The decrease in commercial harvest was linked to a 41.3% decrease in hard blue crab landings from 2019, which may be related to COVID-19 impacts.

The Division of Marine Fisheries said several fishermen told officials that they found it difficult to move blue crabs at the beginning of the state’s stay-at-home order when many restaurants were closed. Hard blue crabs remained the state’s top commercial seafood in terms of pounds landed, while shrimp brought the most money to fishermen at the docks.

The division provided this list of top five species by weight landed commercially from state coastal and estuarine waters in 2020:

SpeciesPounds landedEstimate dockside value
Hard blue crabs13.1 million$19.1 million
Shrimp9.7 million$22.3 million
Summer flounder1.8 million$3.7 million
Spiny dogfish1.5 million$205,016  
Striped mullet1.3 million$651,104

The top five recreationally landed species from coastal and estuarine waters in 2020 were the following:

SpeciesPounds landedNumber of fish landed
Spotted seatrout3.6 million2.1 million
Yellowfin tuna2.4 million83,766
Dolphin2.1 million262,372
Bluefish2.1 million2.1 million
Spanish mackerel1.8 million1.3 million

Anglers took 16.4 million fishing trips in North Carolina coastal and estuarine waters in 2020, about 1.1 million fewer than in 2019.

The Division of Marine Fisheries’ Trip Ticket Program collects commercial fishing landings statistics through statutorily mandated reporting of all commercial fisher-to-dealer transactions.

The division estimates recreational fishing harvests through the Marine Recreational Information Program.

The data for the program is gathered by port agents talking to fishermen at recreational access sites such as piers, boat ramps and charter docks and on the beach. Data is also gathered through mail surveys to license holders. The estimates do not include recreational landings of shrimp, crabs and shellfish.

For the full landings report, see the 2020 Annual Fisheries Bulletin.

Two COVID-19 cases pop up in Hyde County

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The Hyde County Health Department reported Friday that the county has two new COVD-19 cases, up from zero cases in the last several weeks.

“This is a small number of cases, but also indicates that COVID is still in our community, and will transmit accordingly,” said Hyde County Health Director Luana Gibbs in a press release. “Now is the time to be extra vigilant, as indications are that COVID-19 will rise in our communities again.”

Testing inquiries are increasing as cases around Hyde are on the rise.

As of July 23, Hyde County has vaccinated 2,904 individuals with at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, which is 59% of our population. 

There are 2,732 fully vaccinated individuals, which is 55% of the county’s population. 

Gibbs said that getting vaccinated will certainly protect people from getting severely ill or dying from COVID-19. 

However, “because the vaccine is not 100% effective, some people may continue to get COVID, but at a lesser degree of severity,” she said, “and many people who get vaccinated will not get the virus at all.”  

The Delta variant of the virus is prevalent throughout the country, Gibbs said, and because it’s so contagious, now is the time to take action by getting vaccinated

“Our kids will be entering school soon, which gives us even more reason to get vaccinated, and to vaccinate them if they are 12 years of age or older,” she said. 

To make an appointment, call the Ocracoke Health Center at 252-489-3622. Or the Hyde County Health Department at 252-926-4467 Monday through Friday between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. 

According to the July 22 numbers posted online by the NC. Department of Health & Human Services:

  • 1,800 new cases were reported on July 22. As recently as the beginning of this month, there were days when less than 300 new cases were reported.
  • The percentage of positive COVID test results out of all tests administered was reported at 6.7% on July 22. Two weeks earlier, that percentage was 2.8%
  • 751 people are hospitalized with COVID in North Carolina as of July 22. As recently as July 5, the number of people hospitalized was under 400 (391).

For more information on NC COVID metrics visit https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/

On Wednesday, Gov. Roy Cooper announced that the updated Strong Schools NC Public Health Toolkit, which is aligned with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and American Academy of Pediatrics guidance, urges that everything possible be done to keep students in schools and emphasizes continued masking. 

The Toolkit says schools with students in kindergarten through eighth grade should require all children and staff to wear masks indoors regardless of vaccination status. 

Schools with students in ninth through 12th grades should ensure that anyone who isn’t fully vaccinated, including students, wear a mask indoors.

State health officials continue to urge unvaccinated people to follow CDC and NCDHHS guidance and wear a mask indoors, Cooper said in a press release.

When Executive Order 220 expires at the end of July, North Carolina businesses and other entities where masks are required will make their own decisions about requiring masks with strong guidance provided by NCDHHS.

Everyone, regardless of vaccine status, should still wear a mask in certain places such as public transportation and healthcare facilities, the release said.

Trial drone flight delivers supplies to Ocracoke

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A Volansi C-10 Gemini drone arrives at South Dock. Photo by NCDOT

To catch up on Ocracoke news and much more, click here

From our news sources

A trial drone flight on Thursday across the inlet from Hatteras to Ocracoke’s north end could lead to another way to deliver emergency supplies to this furthermost Outer Banks island.

NCDOT’s Division of Aviation, in partnership with the NCDOT Ferry Division and U.S.-based drone logistics company Volansi, completed two successful trial flights of a delivery drone from Hatteras to Ocracoke. 

“This is a tremendous first step in better connecting Ocracoke Island to potentially life-saving supplies and equipment,” said Secretary of Transportation Eric Boyette. “Today, Ocracoke Island is accessible only by plane or by boat. What we’re working on here is an entirely new, third method of serving the needs of Ocracoke’s people.”

For Thursday’s test flights, a the Volansi C-10 Gemini drone took off from the Hatteras Village ferry dock and landed at the South Dock on the north end of Ocracoke Island. The eight-mile round trip flights averaged only 18 minutes in flight time.

To simulate a real post-storm emergency delivery operation, both flights carried small payloads. The first delivered a small survival kit, space blankets and a chocolate muffin to Ocracoke, while the second delivered bottles of water.

The muffin got eaten but the rest of the items were flown back to Hatteras, said NCDOT Spokesman James Pearce in an interview. He said the flight and landing sites were automated.

A basket underneath the drone carried the items, he said, and that basket can be detached, and a camera installed, which would be helpful to the NC Ferry Division to monitor shoaling.

The drone is capable of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) and fixed-wing horizontal flight and can carry a payload up to five pounds.

Pearce said that the flight landing sites were drones are not allowed to fly higher than 400 feet, above which aircraft fly.

The trial flights were possible by a waiver for beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) flight granted under the Federal Aviation Administration’s BEYOND program, which enables select state and local agencies to conduct drone operations that test the future capabilities of the technology.

Typically, the pilot of a drone must keep it within sight at all times, according to FAA rules, Pearce said.

“But with the flight being four and a half miles, they could still see it,” he said.

Pearce said smaller drones can fly in 30- to 40 mph winds.

“This was just a small trial, but we hope to continue scaling this up to larger payloads and longer flights,” said NCDOT Unmanned Aerial Systems Program Manager Ben Spain. “Long-term, we could see deliveries coming to Ocracoke all the way from the mainland.”

The flights were conducted under NCDOT supervision by a team from Volansi, who also provided the aircraft.

The next test will involve flying a drone from Hatteras all the way to the village of Ocracoke but that date has not been set.

The Volansi C-10 Gemini drone in Hatteras prior to take off. NCDOT photo

Ocracoke events July 19 to 25

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Mural art adorns the outside of the Deepwater Theater where the Ocracoke Community Library has been housed since after Dorian hit in 2019. Artists’ work from left are Pattie Johnson Plyler, Christy Dagliesh, Katy Mitchell and Daisy O’Neal. Photo: C. Leinbach

To catch up on Ocracoke news and much more, click here

This post will be updated as more events become known.

Monday, July 19
Friends of the Library Used Book Sale, Ocracoke Community Library (inside Deepwater Theater), 3 to 7 pm Monday through Friday; 9 am to 1 pm Saturday. Summer program: Family story & craft, 6 pm.

Tuesday, July 20
Ocracoke Preservation Society Porch Talk, 1 pm. NPS nature talk
Ocracoke Waterways Commission, 6 pm in the Ocracoke Community Center.  Open to the public with masks as required by NC State.  The meeting will also be broadcast via Facebook at Hyde County Public Information.
Coyote Music Den, 13 Cabana Dr.: Coyote Backyard Concert, 8 pm. All concerts are sliding scale “pay what you can” at the gate. No reservations. Walk, Bike, Taxi or Tram. NO ON-SITE PARKING but the venue has a lot nearby. Visit www.coyotemusic.net for details.
Ocracoke Oyster Company: Bryan Mayer, 7:30 pm.

Wednesday, July 21
Ocracoke Community Library (inside Deepwater Theater), Baby, Toddler & Preschool story time,
10 am.
Coyote Music Den, 13 Cabana Dr: Coyote + Martin Garrish Backyard Concert, 8 pm. All concerts are sliding scale “pay what you can” at the gate. No reservations. Walk, Bike, Taxi or Tram. NO ON-SITE PARKING but
the venue has a lot nearby. Visit www.coyotemusic.net for details.
DAJIO: Barefoot Wade, 7 pm
Ocracoke Oyster Company: Bryan Mayer, 7:30 pm.

Thursday, July 22
DAJIO: Raygun Ruby, 7 pm

Friday, July 23
Ocracoke Community Library (inside Deepwater Theater), Story and activity, 1 pm
Ocracoke Oyster Company: Barefoot Wade, 7:30 pm.

Saturday, July 24
DAJIO: Kate McNally, 7 pm
Ocracoke Oyster Company: Brooke & Nick, 7:30 pm.

National Park Programs on Ocracoke
The National Park Service Ocracoke Island interpretive programs on Ocracoke have begun with the following scheduled. Unless otherwise stated, these programs are outside the NPS Visitor Center at Pilot Town Road by the south end ferry docks.

Stories of Ocracoke Island
Monday to Friday from 11 to 11:30 a.m. Learn about the location and legacy of Ocracoke Island. From serving as an early port village and primary point of entry to North Carolina to Blackbeard’s final battle, Ocracoke Island possesses a unique heritage resulting from its continued remote setting.

Shaping these barrier islands:
Monday to Friday from 2 to 2:30 p.m.  Wars, hurricanes, winds and ocean currents have all had impacts on the shores of Cape Hatteras.

War Comes to Ocracoke
Every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from 4 to 4:30 p.m. Learn about the role Ocracoke Island and the Outer Banks have played in shaping our country’s conflicts.

Ocracoke Island Lighthouse
Tuesday to Friday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit the lighthouse and discuss the details and history of this beautiful beacon. The base of the lighthouse will be staffed and open on dates and times listed above from June 2 through Aug. 13.

Banker Ponies
Every Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 10 to 10:45 a.m. at the Pony Pen. Come meet the ponies who once roamed as a wild herd and learn about their living history on Ocracoke Island.

Explore the Shore
Every Wednesday from 9 to 9:45 a.m. Meet outside at the beach access parking area adjacent to the Ocracoke Campground. Take an easy beach walk with a ranger and learn about what calls the beach its home.

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