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Ocracoke character Captain Carl “Bigfoot” Olshenske: 1944 to 2021

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Capt. Carl. Photo courtesy of the family.

Capt. Carl Olshenske, 77, died unexpectedly on Sept. 22 in his home in Islamorada, Florida.

Born on March 20, 1944, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he was a son of the late Carl Sr. and Gertrude.

A graduate of North Hills High School, he attended the University of Pittsburgh and was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force as a medic.

Carl was a skilled fisherman and snorkel guide, a certified USCG PADI divemaster, a NCDOT Ferry Division crew member, a USCG captain for Boy Scouts of America, an Everglades National Park boat tour captain and a self-proclaimed pirate (200 years too late).

Often referred to as “larger than life,” he spent time with his favorite people in his favorite places — Islamorada and Ocracoke.

He crewed on the old Windfall and was a good shipmate and friend to Capt. Rob Temple who first met him in Flamingo, Florida, in 1982.

On Ocracoke, Capt. Carl lived aboard his vessel Red Red Wine and worked at various places including the Anchorage Marina, the Variety Store, Portsmouth Island Adventures and the Community Store, among others.

He loved a good time and his late beloved macaw Lucy and Himalayan cat Baryshnikov. He was always cheerful and ready with a joke

Carl is survived by his brother Paul (Elizabeth) of Baden, Pennsylvania, and several nieces and nephews.

A celebration of his extraordinary life will be planned for a future date.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Bread of Life Food Pantry on Ocracoke, and MarrVelous Pet Rescues & Adoptions (www.marrvelouspetrescues.org). 

His family asks all to please raise a glass to Capt. Carl in a farewell toast to fair winds and calm seas. 

Sea Fever 

I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, 
And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by; 
And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking, 
And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.
I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide 
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied; 
And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.
I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,
To the gull’s way and the whale’s way where the wind’s like a whetted knife;
And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover,
And a quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over

By John Masefield, 1913 

New N.C. coalition to focus on wind power

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An offshore wind farm. Several North Carolina organizations are looking at the benefits of offshore wind. File photo

Staff report courtesy of CoastalReview.org.

A new coalition of organizations that work to protect North Carolina’s environment is turning its attention to offshore wind.

The Offshore Wind for North Carolina coalition, or OSW4NC, aims to advance offshore wind in North Carolina, the Southeastern Wind Coalition announced Tuesday.

The coalition intends to engage residents, businesses and state and federal leaders to encourage the opportunities that offshore wind presents, “and urge state and federal governments to move forward with policies necessary to reap the full suite of benefits of its offshore wind potential,” officials said. “This includes removing market barriers to offshore wind power, evaluating future wind energy areas off North Carolina’s coast, and ensuring offshore wind is developed in an environmentally responsible manner.”

Founding organizations include Audubon North Carolina, the Chambers for Innovation and Clean Energy, the Environmental Defense FundEnvironmental Entrepreneurs, the North Carolina Coastal Federation, the North Carolina Conservation Network, the North Carolina League of Conservation Voters, the North Carolina Sustainable Energy AssociationSierra Club North Carolina and the Southeastern Wind Coalition.

OSW4NC supports the offshore wind targets Gov. Roy Cooper established through Executive Order 218, including offshore wind energy targets of 2.8-gigawatts by 2030 and 8.0-gigawatts by 2040. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory estimates North Carolina has the highest technical potential for offshore wind generation among Atlantic coast states, officials with Southeastern Wind Coalition said.

N.C. officials urge vaccinations to combat COVID-19

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By Connie Leinbach

With a massive fourth wave, this week the U.S. death toll from COVID-19 hit 675,000, surpassing that of the 1918 influenza outbreak which was the worst pandemic to hit the country in the 20th century, according to estimates by tracking sources.

While the COVID-19 cases across the state appear to be leveling, as Gov. Roy Cooper said in a press briefing Tuesday, the numbers are still too high and the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services today reported 6,288 new COVID-19 cases, up from 4,381 the day before.

N.C. Secretary of Health and Human Services Mandy Cohen on Tuesday said there were 4,381 newly reported cases, which is down from a recent high on Sept. 11 of 11,337 new cases reported.

The average has been about 6,000 new cases per day. At least 1,356,985 people in North Carolina have tested positive for the coronavirus, and at least 15,941 have died since March 2020, according to the NCDHHS.

Both Cooper and Cohen stressed the need for the unvaccinated to get their shots in order to control the pandemic, with Cohen addressing fears about vaccine safety.

“More than one 181 million Americans have been safely vaccinated,” she said. “It is COVID that is making people critically ill.”

Cooper said 90% of North Carolinians aged 65 and older have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

To date, North Carolina has administered over 11 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, with 63 percent of the adult population fully vaccinated. Sixty-eight percent of adults have received at least one dose of the vaccine.

As for Hyde County, the Hyde County Health Department said in a press release Tuesday that as of Sept.17, there were 32 active cases in Hyde County. 

Of the total 770 cases the county has had since the pandemic began in early 2020, seven of those were breakthrough cases, which are cases experienced by people post-vaccination, said Luana Gibbs, Hyde County Health director. Of the total, there have been 11 deaths, all on the mainland. 

According to the NC Department of Health & Human Services COVID-19 dashboard on its website, Ocracoke has had 110 cases.

In Hyde County, 56% of the population is fully vaccinated and 64% have received one dose, Gibbs said.

She said COVID-19 cases spiked during mid to late August but have waned somewhat as of mid-September. 

Gibbs said additional shots are available for residents whose immune systems are compromised, and more information will come later about booster doses.  

Free vaccines against this virus are available in clinics for people aged 12 and over every Tuesday and Thursday and the health department administers COVID-19 tests daily.

For an appointment at Hyde Health, call 252-926-4399.  

The Ocracoke Health Center gives first, second and third doses of COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesdays, said Mandy Cochran, R.N.

She added that the health center will hold another Pfizer vaccine clinic on Oct. 8 for children aged 12 to 17 or for adults who want this vaccine specifically.

Monoclonal antibodies are available for treatment to those infected with COVID-19 who are at high risk of severe outcomes or death, if provided the treatment within the first 10 days of the COVID-19 sickness, Gibbs said.  To get monoclonal antibodies, talk to your health care provider or find a treatment center.

Influenza season, from fall to spring, is upon us, Gibbs said, and she noted that flu shots are available now at the Hyde County Health Department. Cochran said flu shots also are available at the health center as patients come in or if they make an appointment.

The health center will have a flu shot clinic when they receive their allocation of shots, which could happen in early October.

For appointments on Ocracoke, call 252-928-1511.

To reduce your chances of contracting or spreading many of the respiratory driven viruses (common cold, RSV, COVID-19, Flu) wash your hands frequently especially after touching commonly touched items like door handles, shopping carts, etc.; cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze; avoid close contact with people who are sick; stay home if you are sick; avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Doing these protocols and getting vaccinated is the way we’ll beat this virus, Cochran said.

“This isn’t going to go away without vaccines and the protocols,” she said. “That is how this ends.”

Ocracoke birding walk scheduled for Saturday; intro to the ‘NC Bird Atlas’

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Common Yellowthroat. Photo: P. Vankevich

A fall birding trek on Ocracoke is scheduled for Saturday (Sept. 25) starting at 8:30 a.m.

All who are interested are invited to meet at the NPS campground parking lot. From there, the group will check out the beach and dunes, take a walk towards Devil Shoals in the Pamlico Sound and then proceed to the Pony Pasture.

“North Carolina Bird Atlas” coordinators Matt Janson and Sarah Toner will be along and provide information on how folks can report their findings throughout the year.

A five-year project, the atlas will catalog the size and distribution of North Carolina’s bird populations.

Peter Vankevich, compiler of the Ocracoke Christmas Bird Count, is the field trip leader.

Eastern Towhee with straw-colored eyes. Photo: P. Vankevich

Ocracoke events Sept. 20 to 26

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Silver Lake Harbor, Ocracoke, N.C. Photo: C. Leinbach

Tuesday, Sept. 21
The Moonraker Tea Shop will celebrate the Chinese Moon Festival. The shop will offer traditional Chinese moon cakes and two or three Chinese teas to sample during the day. After dark, all are invited to the Lifeguard Beach to gaze at the full moon; shop owner Maria Holt will host the gathering and will offer beverages, such as decaf tea.

Post Dorian support/grief group – free. For residents and their families coping with hurricane PTSD and COVID; meets virtually every Tuesday from 4:30 to 6 pm. Contact Ruth, 252-475-0859, for invite to join via Zoom.

Coyote Music Den, 13 Cabana Dr.: Coyote Backyard Concert, 8 pm. All concerts are sliding scale “pay what you can” at the gate. No reservations. Walk, Bike, Taxi or Tram. NO ON-SITE PARKING but the venue has a lot nearby. Visit www.coyotemusic.net for details.

Wednesday, Sept. 22
Coyote Music Den, 13 Cabana Dr: Coyote + Martin Garrish Backyard Concert, 8 pm. All concerts are sliding scale “pay what you can” at the gate. No reservations. Walk, Bike, Taxi or Tram. NO ON-SITE PARKING but the venue has a lot nearby. Visit www.coyotemusic.net for details.

The Breeze: Corey Stewart, 9pm

Thursday, Sept. 23
The Breeze: Corey Stewart, 9pm

Friday, Sept. 24
Ocracoke Tourism Development Authority, 9 am. Ocracoke Community Center. The public may attend via the Hyde County Public Information page on Facebook. See agenda below.

The Breeze: High Frequency, 9pm

Saturday, Sept. 25
Ocracoke Oyster Company, 6:30 pm, Brooke & Nick

DAJIO: The Ray McAllister Band, 8 pm

The Breeze: High Frequency, 9pm

National Park Service Ocracoke Island interpretive programs on Ocracoke continue until Oct. 11.

They are held outside the Ocracoke Discovery Center at Pilot Town Road by the south end ferry docks.

Consistent with CDC guidance regarding areas of substantial or high transmission, visitors to Cape Hatteras National Seashore, regardless of vaccination status, are required to wear a mask inside all park buildings.

The Ocracoke Discovery Center offers trip planning information and a variety of educational exhibits. Visitors can experience
exhibits that include a slideshow of historic photographs, a children’s activity corner, touch-and-feel table and information desk. Open Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m.

Stories of Ocracoke Island: 11 a.m., Monday to Friday
Learn about the location and legacy of Ocracoke Island. From serving as an early port village and primary point of entry to North Carolina to Blackbeard’s final battle, Ocracoke Island possess a unique heritage from its continued remote setting. Meet outside of Discovery Center at benches. (20-minute talk)

Barrier Islands: 2 p.m., Monday to Friday
Wars, hurricanes, winds, and ocean currents have all had impacts on the shores of Cape Hatteras. Join us to learn about some of these events and the changes they have made to these islands. Meet outside of Discovery Center at benches.
(20-minute talk)

Ocracoke Lighthouse:
Rangers will be stationed at the Ocracoke Lighthouse and provide access into the base of the oldest functioning lighthouse in North Carolina. Saturday

to Monday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday to Friday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Moon festival to welcome fall on Ocracoke

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The full moon, photographed on May 27, 2021, by Richard Taylor

The Moonraker Tea Shop will celebrate the Chinese Moon Festival on Sept. 21, a full moon night.

The shop will offer traditional Chinese moon cakes and two or three Chinese teas to sample during the day, star-gazing kits and other moon-related items for sale, said Maria Holt, owner.

The moon cakes she has ordered from two Chinese bakeries in California are dumpling-like pastries made with lotus paste with an egg yolk inside wrapped in a pastry.

“The eggs represent the moon, and the paste represents the firmament,” she said. “It’s actually quite good.”

Round foods are popular for this festival as their shapes mimic the moon.

After dark, all are invited to the Lifeguard Beach to gaze at the full moon where Holt will host the gathering that will offer beverages, such as decaf tea.

Holt will have some binoculars available for viewing the nightscape.

“It’s more like family and friends hanging out that night,” she said. “Bring your own chair.”

The Moon Festival, often referred to as Chinese Thanksgiving, she said, is held on the first full moon of the fall.

Ocracoke Wellness Collective: More than a spa–updated

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Callie Davisson, Brooke German and Kate McNally outside their Wellness Collective at the Castle B&B pool house. Photo: C. Leinbach

Editor’s note: The open house originally reported for Saturday, Sept. 25, has been postponed to mid-October, date TBD.

By Connie Leinbach

The body is a map of our experiences and the three women of the Ocracoke Wellness Collective want to help islanders and visitors get more in touch with their bodies.

The women, who each have independent businesses inside the pool house of the Castle B&B at 155 Silver Lake Drive, are offering more than just spa services.

They are Kate McNally, Brooke German and Callie Davisson.

“This is a central space for wellness and mindfulness to happen,” said German, as the three recently talked about their vision.

While they are a collective, each woman has something different to offer since not every therapist is going to be the right fit for an individual.

“Someone may prefer Callie’s style of bodywork over mine, or if they don’t necessarily feel comfortable with a lot of touch, Brooke may be a better fit,” McNally said. “Either way, we all have our own unique qualities. I just love that there are different elements to what we’re offering.”

German offers non-invasive sound therapy with Tibetan singing bowls and other instruments. 

Kate McNally also offers herbal consultations, having recently received her certificate of completion from the Chestnut School of Herbal Medicine for her Live Oak Tea & Botanicals business. Photo: C. Leinbach

“The sound does the work,” she said about what she does. “The sound and its vibrations literally slows the body and the mind down enabling the person to enter deep relaxation, which is the goal.”  

When you enter that deep relaxation, the brain waves slow down, and that’s where the magic starts to happen, she said. 

 “When you get mentally and physically at that state, you’re giving the nervous system time to repair,” she said.

A lot of research shows, she said, that when you can get to that deep point of relaxation — when the brain basically becomes quiet — the body it wants to rejuvenate itself.

McNally offers massage therapy and herbal consultations, having recently received her certificate of completion from the Chestnut School of Herbal Medicine for her Live Oak Tea & Botanicals business.

Like many locals who have more than one job, McNally also teaches yoga and performs at several local restaurants, as does German, who plays the cello and sings with her husband, Nick Derrick.

“Collectively, the three of us can kind of combine forces and maybe empower clients to facilitate a sense of wellbeing,” McNally said.  “We give them the tools that they need to keep that going, as opposed to just having to invest a small fortune in seeing us every week.”

“Listening to your body is not really a thing that we learn,” McNally said.

So, the three want clients to stop and breathe, and have a dedication to taking care of yourself.

“I like to tell my clients that it took longer than an hour for this to happen,” Davisson said. “It’s going to take longer than one hour for it to undo.”

She specializes in “lomi lomi,” or Hawaiian style massage, which involves long strokes up and down the body; a lot of figure eights; stretching. “There’s just a lot of movement to it.”

She does Reiki and foot reflexology and plans to learn cranial-sacral.

McNally offers Swedish deep tissue with a little bit of trigger point and myofascial integrated.

Her specialty is Thai massage in which the client is fully clothed, on the floor and on a mat. “There’s no oil, and there’s a lot of rhythmic compression and gentle rocking and passive range of motion,” she said. “It’s almost like passive yoga.”

For services, each therapist has her own number from which to make appointments.

Kate McNally: 828-768-7800; Callie Davisson: 252-944-7974; Brooke German: 757-275-6897.

Kate McNally, Callie Davisson and Brooke German explain their services. Photo: C. Leinbach

New Ocracoke departure schedule for Swan Quarter surprises islanders

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On the Swan Quarter ferry. Photo: C. Leinbach

By Connie Leinbach

Ocracoke Island residents and visitors traveling to Swan Quarter had to do a quick change on Tuesday when the fall schedule had a different set of departures than islanders are used to.

Typically, the N.C. Ferry Division reduces runs between Ocracoke, Hatteras, Swan Quarter and Cedar Island in the fall and through the winter when ridership declines.

Typically, a mid-day or evening run to Swan Quarter is dropped, but this time, the 7 a.m. departure from Ocracoke has been dropped.

The schedule to Swan Quarter from now to May 24 changed the departures from Ocracoke to 10 a.m., 1:30 and 6:30 p.m. For the new winter ferry schedule, click here.

A number of islanders who rely on the 7 a.m. departure to do errands and see doctors in (little) Washington, have to scramble.

One of those was islander Monroe Gaskill, who learned about the change on Monday, the day before the schedule change.

Gaskill gets on the 7 a.m. ferry, goes to Belhaven to load up on product for his sand and gravel spreading business, and then gets on the 2 p.m. ferry, he said. When he gets back to Ocracoke, he still has daylight during which he can spread sand or gravel for customers.

With this new schedule, he will return in the dark and not be able to spread his product right away.

Celeste Brooks, Ocracoke postmaster, noted that all of her doctors are in Washington.

“I can get the 7 a.m. ferry, get to a doctor’s appointment, run to a store and get back in time to catch the 4:30 ferry,” she said.

Now, she’ll have to go over the day before, which will take more time, and although she has somewhere to stay, many on Ocracoke would have to spring for a motel room.

Another alternative would be to take an early ferry to Hatteras (4:30 a.m., 6:30, 7:30) and drive 64 miles to Manteo and head to their destinations from there.

Timothy Hass, Ferry Division spokesman, said in an email that the biggest reason for the schedule change is due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Since Dorian made landfall two years ago, the crews for the early run to Swan Quarter have been housed together in very small campers,” Hass said. “Given the current spread of COVID in the area, we can no longer house so many people in such tight quarters safely.

“Those crews are now staying in Swan Quarter. Once the new dormitory on Ocracoke is complete, the Ferry Division plans to reinstate the early morning run between Ocracoke and Swan Quarter.”

Work on the Ocracoke dormitory and the ferry office, both of which had been flooded by Hurricane Dorian Sept. 6, 2019, only began in the last few months but the dormitory is expected to be completed in January or February, Hass said.

Hass also said that the 7 a.m. run to Swan Quarter “has been one of the least traveled of all the departures on Pamlico Sound with an average of less than 20 vehicles (40 percent capacity).”

In the winter, it has an average of less than 10 vehicles, or 20 percent capacity. 

“The schedule change is a matter of the health and safety of our crews and the traveling public and is unavoidable until the housing situation on Ocracoke is rectified,” he said. 

Several islanders were concerned about what islanders would do when faced with jury duty in Swan Quarter.

“The Ferry Division is working with the Clerk of Superior Court to make special arrangements on the dates when jurors from Ocracoke are needed for duty,” Hass said in the email, though he didn’t explain how that would work. “We estimate there may be six such occasions over the course of the winter, and we will make sure jurors are able to get to their assignments on those days.”

Randal Mathews, Ocracoke’s Hyde County commissioner, said the Ferry Division ran the schedule change by him and Hyde County Manager Kris Noble.

“I guess they’re doing what they need to do,” he said.

He said the Ferry Division is working with about half the staff they normally have due to COVID-19 and the difficulty getting funding from the state legislature.

“Two of the older captains don’t want to stay in the campers,” he said, referring to the several trailers installed on Ocracoke after Dorian to house ferry workers.

Ferry crews typically work one week on and one week off, but some have had to work three weeks on and one week off due to staffing issues, he said.

As for the delay in reconstructing the ferry buildings, Mathews noted how all of the local contractors have been slammed since Dorian.

Complicating things for government projects is the requirement for high-priced projects to receive three bids and sometimes, owing to the island’s remoteness, three bids might not be received, necessitating another round of bid requests.

Passenger ferry between Ocracoke and Hatteras remains popular

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Passengers debark the Ocracoke Express on a nice July day. Photo: P. Vankevich

From our news sources

More than 16,500 people left their cars behind and used the Ocracoke Express passenger ferry this summer, and surveys revealed that the third season of passenger ferry service was a popular one.

In a press release, the N.C. Ferry Division said the season, which began June 21 and ended on Labor Day, saw a total of 16,594 people use the passenger ferry service, which allowed riders to skip the vehicle ferry waits and dock in Hatteras and Ocracoke villages.

The crossing takes 65 minutes, about the same as the car ferry, which lands on the north end of the island. The fare was $5 each way, with an additional $1 charge for bicycles. Children 3 and under could ride for free.

A total of 1,020 passengers brought their bicycles along for the ride.

This season, the Ocracoke Express served an average of 213 passengers a day, more than double the 97 per day of 2020.

In its inaugural start in the summer of 2019, the Ocracoke Express carried nearly 29,000 passengers between Ocracoke and Hatteras islands during a longer season.

The passenger ferry made three daily round trips , leaving from Hatteras at 9:30 a.m. and 1 and 4:30 p.m. and from Ocracoke: 11 a.m., 3 p.m., and 8 p.m.

Passenger surveys taken over the 2021 season showed the service as a popular option, with 94% of respondents rating it as either “Excellent” or “Good.”

According to the press release, among the comments received, one passenger said “It’s a lovely ride, it’s easy to manage, the people are all super friendly and it could not be more convenient. It makes the whole day more enjoyable!”

The Ferry Division plans on continuing its passenger ferry service during the 2022 summer season.

Ocracoke events Sept. 13 to 19

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The all-day, Island-wide Yard Sale will be Saturday, Sept. 18.

Tuesday, Sep 14
Post Dorian support/grief group – free. For residents and their families coping with hurricane PTSD and COVID; meets virtually every Tuesday from 4:30 to 6 pm. Contact Ruth, 252-475-0859, for invite to join via Zoom

Coyote Music Den, 13 Cabana Dr.: Coyote Backyard Concert, 8 pm. All concerts are sliding scale “pay what you can” at the gate. No reservations. Walk or bike. NO ON-SITE PARKING but the venue has a lot nearby. Visit www.coyotemusic.net for details.

Wednesday, Sept. 15
Coyote Music Den, 13 Cabana Dr.: Coyote + Martin Garrish Backyard Concert, 8 pm. All concerts are sliding scale “pay what you can” at the gate. No reservations. Walk or bike. NO ON-SITE PARKING but the venue has a lot nearby. Visit www.coyotemusic.net for details.

Thursday, Sept. 16
“TIDE and TIME” Photoville Fence exhibit by N.C. photographer Justin Cook opens at the Salvo Day Use area on Hatteras Island. Exhibit will be up for several months. See graphic below.

Friday, Sept. 17
Ocracoke Oyster Company: Willis Gupton, 6:30pm 

The Breeze: The Lost Artists, 9pm

Saturday, Sept. 18
Island-wide yard sale, 8 am to 5 pm

Ocracoke Oyster Company: Willis Gupton, 6:30pm 

The Breeze: The Lost Artists, 9 pm

NCDOT’s annual Fall Litter Sweep will run from Sept. 11 to 25. To sign up online, visit ncdot.gov/littersweep. For details about this and more cleanups, click here.

National Park Service Ocracoke Island interpretive programs on Ocracoke continue until Oct. 11.

They are held outside the Ocracoke Discovery Center at Pilot Town Road by the south end ferry docks.

Consistent with CDC guidance regarding areas of substantial or high transmission, visitors to Cape Hatteras National Seashore,
regardless of vaccination status, are required to wear a mask inside all park buildings.

The Ocracoke Discovery Center offers trip planning information and a variety of educational exhibits. Visitors can experience
exhibits that include a slideshow of historic photographs, a children’s activity corner, touch-and-feel table and information desk. Open Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m.

Stories of Ocracoke Island: 11 a.m., Monday to Friday
Learn about the location and legacy of Ocracoke Island. From serving as an early port village and primary point of entry to North Carolina to Blackbeard’s final battle, Ocracoke Island possess a unique heritage from its continued remote setting. Meet outside of Discovery Center at benches. (20-minute talk)

Barrier Islands: 2 p.m., Monday to Friday
Wars, hurricanes, winds, and ocean currents have all had impacts on the shores of Cape Hatteras. Join us to learn about some of these events and the changes they have made to these islands. Meet outside of Discovery Center at benches. (20-minute talk)

Ocracoke Lighthouse:
Rangers will be stationed at the Ocracoke Lighthouse and provide access into the base of the oldest functioning lighthouse in North Carolina. Saturday to Monday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday to Friday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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